Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Raymond Ibrahim: Are Islamic State Atrocities the Product of 'Grievances'?

The following by Raymond Ibrahim is reposted here with permission of Middle East Forum:

Islamic State Atrocities: Products of 'Grievances'?

by Raymond Ibrahim
FrontPage Magazine
September 17, 2014


While many have rightfully criticized U.S. President Obama's recent assertion that the Islamic State "is not Islamic," some of his other equally curious but more subtle comments pronounced in the same speech have been largely ignored.

Consider the president's invocation of the "grievances" meme to explain the Islamic State's success: "At this moment the greatest threats come from the Middle East and North Africa, where radical groups exploit grievances for their own gain. And one of those groups is ISIL—which calls itself the Islamic State."

Obama's logic, of course, is fortified by an entire apparatus of professional apologists who make the same claim. Thus Georgetown professor John Esposito—whose apologetics sometimes morph into boldfaced lies—also recentlydeclared that "The "primary drivers [for the Islamic State's violence] are to be found elsewhere," that is, not in Islam but in a "long list of grievances."

In other words and once again, it's apparently somehow "our fault" that Islamic State Muslims are behaving savagely—crucifying, beheading, enslaving, and massacring people only on the basis that they are "infidels": thus when IS herds and slaughters "infidel" and/or Shia men (citing the example of the prophet)—that's because they're angry at something America did; when IS captures "infidel" Yazidi and Christian women and children, andsells them on the sex-slave market (citing Islamic teachings)—that's because they're angry at something America did; when IS bombs churches, breaks their crosses, and tells Christians to convert or die (citing Islamic scriptures)—that's because they're angry at something America did.

Although the "grievance" meme has always flown in the face of logic, it became especially popular after the 9/11 al-Qaeda strikes on America. The mainstream media, following the Islamist propaganda network Al Jazeera's lead, uncritically picked up and disseminated Osama bin Laden's videotapes to the West where he claimed that al-Qaeda's terror campaign was motivated by grievances against the West—grievances that ranged from U.S. support for Israel to U.S. failure to sign the Kyoto Agreement concerning climate change.

Of course, that was all rubbish, and I have written more times than I care to remember about how in their internal Arabic-language communiques to fellow Muslims that never get translated to English, al-Qaeda and virtually every Islamist organization make it a point to insist that jihad is an Islamic obligation that has nothing to do with grievances.

Consider Osama's own words in an internal letter to fellow Saudis:
Our talks with the infidel West and our conflict with them ultimately revolve around one issue — one that demands our total support, with power and determination, with one voice — and it is: Does Islam, or does it not, force people by the power of the sword to submit to its authority corporeally if not spiritually? 
Yes. There are only three choices in Islam: [1] either willing submission [conversion]; [2] or payment of the jizya, through physical, though not spiritual, submission to the authority of Islam; [3] or the sword — for it is not right to let him [an infidel] live. The matter is summed up for every person alive: Either submit, or live under the suzerainty of Islam, or die. (The Al Qaeda Reader, p. 42)
Conversion, submission, or the sword is, of course, the mission of the Islamic State—not alleviating "grievances."
Worst of all, unlike al-Qaeda, the Islamic State, from day one of its existence, has made it very clear—in Osama's words, "with power and determination, with one voice"—that its massacres, enslavements, crucifixions, and beheadings of "infidels" are all based on Islamic law or Sharia—not silly "grievances" against the West. Unlike al-Qaeda, the Islamic State is confident enough to avoid the grievances/taqiyya game and forthrightly asserts its hostility for humans based on their religious identity.

Yet by slipping the word "grievances" to explain the Islamic State's Sharia-based savageries, Obama apparently hopes America has been thoroughly conditioned like Pavlov's dog to automatically associate Islamic world violence with the word "grievance."

What Obama fails to understand—or fails to mention—is that, yes, the Islamic State, al-Qaeda, and countless angry Muslims around the world are indeed often prompted to acts of violence by "grievances." But as fully explained here, these "grievances" are not predicated on any universal standards of equality or justice, only a supremacist worldview.

Raymond Ibrahim is author of Crucified Again: Exposing Islam's New War on Christians (Regnery, 2013). A Middle East and Islam expert, he is a Shillman Fellow at the David Horowitz Freedom Center, an associate fellow at the Middle East Forum and author of The Al Qaeda Reader: The Essential Texts of Osama Bin Laden's Terrorist Organization.

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