Tuesday, November 10, 2009

A Lesson On The Difference Between Israel And The Palestinians That Speaks Volumes

Israel has arrested an alleged terrorist--who is Jewish:
The Shin Bet (Israel Security Agency) and Israel Police have arrested an American-born Jewish settler who is allegedly behind an unprecedented series of deadly terror shootings and bombings spanning over a decade, in which two Palestinians were killed and Israel Prize Laureate Prof. Ze'ev Sternhell was injured. According to the Shin Bet, he also planted a bomb at the entrance to house of a messianic family in Ariel, seriously wounding their son, then-15-year-old Ami Ortiz.
But that is where the similarity to Palestinian terrorists end, because the difference in the way that Israel will treat the suspect speaks volumes on the difference between Israel and the Palestinian Arab leaders

Dr. Aaron Lerner writes:
Yaakov Teitel will have his day in Israeli court and, if convicted, spend a
good part of the remainder of his life behind bars.

Prime Minister Netanyahu isn't asking for Jewish terrorist Yaakov Teitel to
be freed.

There are no Israeli security forces planning to capture Palestinians to
trade for Yaakov Teitel's release.

The Israeli school system isn't teaching that Yaakov Teitel is a hero.

No summer camp sponsored by a leading Israeli political party is going to be
named after Yaakov Teitel.

Yaakov Teitel's family isn't going to get a monthly stipend from the
Government of Israel as a sign of thanks for his actions.
This is in contrast to the Palestinian leadership--not just Hamas, but also the supposed 'moderate' head of Fatah, Mahmoud Abbas. From an article from this past May:
The PA chose to name its latest computer center "after the martyr Dalal Mughrabi," who led the most deadly terror attack in the country's history. Her 1978 bus hijacking killed 37 civilians, 12 of them children, including American photographer Gail Rubin. The new center is funded by Abbas's office, which is bolstered by Western aid money. (Al-Ayyam, May 5).

...
Last summer the PA sponsored "the Dalal Mughrabi football championship" for kids, and a "summer camp named for martyr Dalal Mughrabi... out of honor and admiration for the martyr." It also held a party to honor exemplary students, also named "for the martyr Dalal Mughrabi," under the auspices of Abbas and at which Abbas's representative "reviewed the heroic life of the martyr [Mughrabi] (Al-Hayat al-Jadida, July 23, 24 and August 8, 2008). All these PA-funded activities were to teach kids that a killer of women and children is a role model.

TWO MONTHS AGO, 31 years to the day after the Mughrabi murders, PA TV broadcast a special program celebrating the terror attack, calling the killing of 37 civilians "one of the most important and most prominent special operations... carried out by a team of heroes and led by the heroic fighter Dalal Mughrabi" (PA TV March 11). And its not just Mughrabi who is a Palestinian hero. Despite professions in English by Abbas and other PA leaders that they reject terror, the PA has a long and odious history in Arabic of celebrating terrorists as role models and heroes, often involving US money.

USAID spent $400,000 in 2004 to build the Salakh Khalaf soccer field. After Palestinian Media Watch reported that Khalaf was the head of the Palestinian terror group that murdered 11 Israeli athletes at the Munich Olympics and two American diplomats in Sudan, USAID publicly apologized and said it would demand that the PA change the name. The name was never changed.

In 2002, US money funded renovations of the "Dalal Mughrabi school for girls." After PMW alerted the US State Department to Mughrabi's terrorist past, the funding was cancelled. Within 24 hours, the PA said the name would be changed, and the American money was reinstated. Once the work was completed, however, the school was renamed for the terrorist. It bears Mughrabi's name to this day.

Explain again, please, why the rush to give these people--who have never had their own country-- a state?

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